Sharing our research on student volunteering, critical pedagogy and compassion in nurse education

Research by Professors Sue Dyson and Olga van den Akker, Dr Liang Liu  and Mike O’Driscoll uniquely draws together three important concepts for the first time:  namely student volunteering, critical thinking skills for nurses, and caring and compassionate nursing practice and shows how these relate to critical pedagogy in the nurse education.  The programme of research has so far resulted in three conference papers, one peer-reviewed publication, a book and international collaboration with Dr Kwadwo Korsah  at the University of Ghana School of Nursing in Accra and the establishment of academic networks in Canada, Australia, and Latvia.

Conference papers Mike O’Driscoll, a researcher in CCRNM, presented findings of research into the role that volunteering  can play in developing critical pedagogy within nurse education at the AITNER Sociology conference in Athens in May  and at the National Council of Voluntary Organisations Research Conference in Nottingham, in September. Also in September, Professor Sue Dyson presented findings from the research at the World Congress on Nursing & Nurse Education Conference in Rome.

The presentations were very well received and led to many interesting discussions around volunteering in health professional education and how critical pedagogy relates to compassionate care.

The presentation titled The extent, variability and attitudes towards volunteering among nursing students: Implications for pedagogy in nurse education’  presented by Mike O’Driscoll at the AITNER conference in Athens can be downloaded here AITNER 2017 PRESENTATION.

Peer-reviewed publication Findings from this research have also been published in the peer reviewed journal Nurse Education in Practice.

Book The research is the subject of the book by Professor Sue Dyson to be published on October 7th. 2017: Critical Pedagogy in Nursing: Transformational Approaches to Nurse Education in a Globalized World (Palgrave Macmillan).

The programme of research continues and for further information please contact Professor Sue Dyson (s.dyson@mdx.ac.uk).

 

New research highlights delegation as key skill for nursing students

Middlesex’s Prof Helen Allan collaborates on ground-breaking study revealing importance of delegation training for nurses

A new study carried out by researcher Helen Allan, Professor of Nursing at Middlesex, and colleagues at the University of Surrey, University of Salford and UCL Institute of Education sheds light on the practice of delegation in NHS nursing roles.

The research – which followed newly qualified nurses in four hospital trusts across England over a three year period – found increased educational and organisational support is needed to develop nurses’ delegation skills.

The team identified five styles of delegator among the nurses they followed. These ranged from the ‘do-it-all’ nurse who felt unable to delegate anything, to the ‘inspector’ who delegates but constantly checks the work of others for fear of being held accountable for mistakes.

Professor Allan’s work highlights an immediate concern as the most recent Nursing and Midwifery Council Code of Conduct states registered nurses should be accountable for their decisions to delegate tasks.

“Our research focuses on a little understood area of nursing – the delegation of key nursing tasks to untrained and unregistered care staff,” she says.

“Delegation falls into the category of essential nursing task which has for many years gone unacknowledged and unvalued.

“It is important because patients’ safety rests on effective delegation between nurses and care assistants. In fact, delegation is important across the whole health care team.”

The research findings will feed directly into Middlesex’s undergraduate nursing and midwifery courses to ensure students graduate with the necessary skills to delegate effectively.

“It’s important to act according to your Code of Conduct, which for the first time specifically stipulates that effective delegation is a key role for registered nurses,” explains Helen.

“Always feel confident that you know how to do what’s expected of you – and that anybody you ask to do something is competent too.”

Read the full study on delegation styles among newly qualified nurses here.

(content from Middlesex University web team http://www.mdx.ac.uk/news/2017/02/new-research-highlights-delegation-as-key-skill-for-nursing-students)